Ananas Comosus Plant

Ananas Comosus Plant. Ananas comosus is a plant that bears beautiful leaves, but what makes the plant famous is its fruit: Sheds part of its foliage during winter/autumn.

Pineapple Diseases
Pineapple Diseases from www.growables.org

Ananas comosus, commonly called pineapple, is a terrestrial bromeliad that was originally discovered growing in tropical areas of south america (principally brazil). The stems and leaves are a source of fiber and can be processed into paper or 'pina cloth'. Pineapple (ananas comosus (l) merr.) is in the bromeliad family, which has about 45 genera and 2000 species.

Direct sunlight, 12 to 14 hours:

Ananas comosus is grown for its delicious fruit but it also cultivated as an ornamental plant due to the beauty of the evergreen foliage, flowers and fruit. Pineapple is by far the most economically important bromeliad and is the only one grown commercially. In spring and summer maintain a bit of moisture in the soil mix and provide liquid leaf plant fertiliser every fortnight.

Water only if the soil is dry.

Dense spikes of tubular purple flowers with reddish bracts in summer are followed by small, ornamental fruit. Ananas comosus is a seedless cultigen (a plant that has been altered by humans through a process of selective breeding). Bromelain extracted from pineapple may be used as a meat tenderizer.

Pineapple (ananas comosus (l) merr.) is in the bromeliad family, which has about 45 genera and 2000 species.

It has silver foliage and miniature, inedible. Cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions. Prefers 6 or more hours of sun per day.

This commercial food plant is native to brazil.

Water ideally with water that is already at. Because it has been in cultivation for thousands of years, its exact origins are unknown. Sheds part of its foliage during winter/autumn.

Its leaves are spiky, thick, long, and arranged in spiral forming a rosette of up to 1 m high and 1.5 m wide.

Will get damaged and possibly killed. In the summer, you can move pineapple plants outdoors to a location that receives partial sun. From fall through early spring make sure these bromeliads are in a location that receives a half day of direct light.

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